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Effect of air stacking training on pulmonary function, respiratory strength and peak cough flow in persons with cervical spinal cord injury
Phys Ther Rehabil Sci 2018;7:147-53
Published online December 30, 2018
© 2018 Korean Academy of Physical Therapy Rehabilitation Science.

Sang-Kyun Ana, and Won-Seob Shinb

aDepartment of Physical Therapy, Graduate School of Daejeon University, Daejeon, Republic of Korea
bDepartment of Physical Therapy, College of Health and Medical Science, Daejeon University, Daejeon, Republic of Korea
Correspondence to: Won-Seob Shin (ORCID https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6515-7020)
Department of Physical Therapy, College of Health and Medical Science, Daejeon University, 62 Daehak-ro, Dong-gu, Daejeon 34520, Republic of Korea
Tel: 82-42-280-2290 Fax: 82-42-280-2295 E-mail: shinws@dju.kr
Received October 23, 2018; Revised November 16, 2018; Accepted November 17, 2018.
cc This is an Open-Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Objective: This study investigated the effects of air stacking training (AST) on pulmonary function, respiratory strength, and peak cough flow (PCF) in persons with cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI).
Design: Randomized controlled trial.
Methods: A total of 24 persons with CSCI were randomly allocated to the AST group (n=12) or the incentive spirometry training (IST) group (n=12). Patients with CSCI received AST or IST for 15 minutes, with 3 sessions per week for 4 weeks, and all groups performed basic exercises for 15 minutes. In the AST group, after the subject inhaled the maximal amount of air as best as possible, the therapist insufflated additional air into the patient’s lung using an oral nasal mask about 2-3 times. In the IST group, patients were allowed to hold for three seconds at the maximum inspiration and then to breathe. The pre and post-tests measured forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume one at second (FEV1), maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and PCF.
Results: Both groups showed significant improvements in FVC, FEV1, MEP, MIP and PCF values after training (p<0.05). The FVC in the post-test and the mean change of FVC, FEV1, MIP were significantly higher in the AST group than the IST group (p<0.05).
Conclusions: The findings of this study suggested that AST significantly improved pulmonary function, respiratory strength, and PCF in persons with CSCI. Therefore, AST should be included in respiratory rehabilitation programs to improve coughing ability, pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength.
Keywords : Breathing exercises, Spinal cord injuries, Maximal respiratory pressures

 

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